The Musician's Guide to Theory and Analysis
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Index of All Scores


 Chapter 1 - Pitch and Pitch Class

  1. Example 1.5 - Ledger lines and grand staff in "On Top of Old Smoky"

 Chapter 2 - Beat, Meter, and Rhythm: Simple Meters

  1. Example 2.3 - Foster, "Oh! Susanna," mm. 1-8

 Chapter 3 - Pitch Collections, Scales, and Major Keys

  1. Example 3.3 - Sherman and Sherman, "Feed the Birds," mm. 1-4
  2. Example 3.9 - Menken and Rice, "A Whole New World," mm. 1-6
  3. Example 3.10 - Foster, "Camptown Races," mm. 1-8
  4. Example 3.11 - Bach, Invention in C Major, m. 1 (PT model)
  5. Example 3.12 - "Michael Finnigin" (TP model)

 Chapter 4 - Minor Keys and the Diatonic Modes

  1. Example 4.11 - "Old Joe Clark" (melody)
  2. Example 4.14 - "Wayfaring Stranger" (melody)
  3. Example 4.15 - Lennon and McCartney, "Eleanor Rigby," mm. 9-12a

 Chapter 5 - Beat, Meter, and Rhythm: Compound Meters

  1. Example 5.01 - "Down in the Valley," mm. 1-4a
  2. Example 5.02 - Lennon and McCartney, "Norwegian Wood," mm. 13-14
  3. Example 5.03 - Bach, Fugue in E-flat Major for Organ, (St. Anne), mm. 38-40
  4. Example 5.05 - Bach, Fugue in E-flat Major for Organ, (St. Anne), mm. 77-82a
  5. Example 5.06 - Bach, Fugue in E-flat Major for Organ, (St. Anne), mm. 56-59 (with hemiola)
  6. Example 5.08 - Livingston, David, and Hoffman, "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo," mm. 3-6a
  7. Example 5.09 - Brahms, Trio in E-flat Major for Piano, Violin, and Horn, Op. 40, second movement, mm. 9-18
  8. Example 5.10 - Chopin, Nocturne in E-flat Major, Op. 9, No. 2, mm. 16-18

 Chapter 6 - Pitch Intervals

There are no Scores & Audio available for this chapter.


 Chapter 7 - Triads and Seventh Chords

  1. Example 7.15 - Van Heusen and Burke, "Here's That Rainy Day," mm. 5-12
  2. Example 7.17 - Van Heusen and Burke, "Here's That Rainy Day," mm. 13-20


 Chapter 8 - Intervals in Action (Two-Voice Composition)

  1. Example 8.5 - "Auld Lang Syne," mm. 1-2a (melody)
  2. Example 8.12 - Bach, "Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott," mm. 1-4a (soprano and bass)
  3. Example 8.14 - Lloyd Webber and Rice, "Don't Cry for Me Argentina,"(a) mm. 33-40

 Chapter 9 - Melodic and Rhythmic Embellishment in Two-Voice Composition

  1. Example 9.16 - Fux, Gradus ad Parnassum, fifth species

 Chapter 10 - Notation and Scoring

  1. Example 10.06(b) - Ives, Variations on "America" for Organ, mm. 1-6 of theme
  2. Example 10.07 - Beethoven, Variations on "God Save the King," mm. 1-6
  3. Example 10.10 - "Rich and Rare," mm. 1-4

 Chapter 11 - Voicing Chords in Multiple Parts: Instrumentation

  1. Example 11.3 - Rodgers and Hart, "My Funny Valentine," mm. 1-8
  2. Example 11.4 - Brahms, Symphony No. 1 in C minor, first movement, mm. 1-3


 Chapter 12 - The Basic Phrase Model: Tonic and Dominant Voice-Leading

  1. Example 12.5 - Schubert, "Die Forelle," mm. 1-10a
  2. Example 12.12 - Beethoven, Tempest Sonata, third movement, mm. 4-8a
  3. Example 12.19 - "Clementine" (melody)
  4. Example 12.20 - "Clementine," mm. 1-10a
  5. Example 12.21(a) - "Merrily We Roll Along" (arrangement)
  6. Example 12.21(b) - "Merrily We Roll Along" (with jump-bass accompaniment)
  7. Example 12.22(c) - "Merrily We Roll Along" (arpeggiated setting)

 Chapter 13 - Embellishing Tones

  1. Example 13.4 - Bach, Prelude in E-flat Major for Organ (St. Anne), mm. 1-4
  2. Example 13.6 - Bach, Heut' ist, o Mensch ("This Day, O Mankind"), mm. 3b-6a (alternating 4-3 and 9-8 suspensions)
  3. Example 13.7 - Bach, "Liebster Jesu," mm. 11-15
  4. Example 13.8 - Bach, "Christ ist erstanden," mm. 9-10
  5. Example 13.9 - Bach, Prelude in E-flat Major for Organ (St. Anne), mm. 204-205 (final cadence)
  6. Example 13.11 - Bach, Organ Sonata No. 5 in C Major, first movement, mm. 35-38
  7. Example 13.12 - Menken and Rice, "A Whole New World," mm. 32b-37a
  8. Example 13.13 - Lloyd Webber and Rice, "Don't Cry for Me Argentina," mm. 3-10a

 Chapter 14 - Chorale Harmonization and Figured Bass

  1. Example 14.10 - Bach (modified), "Ach Gott, vom Himmel sieh' darein," mm. 1-2a (soprano and figured bass)

 Chapter 15 - Expanding the Basic Phrase: Leading-Tone, Predominant, and 64 Chords

  1. Example 15.10 - Mozart, Piano Sonata in B-flat Major, K. 333, first movement, mm. 1-4a
  2. Example 15.11 - Foster, "Camptown Races," mm. 12b-16
  3. Example 15.16 - Lloyd Webber and Rice, "Don't Cry for Me Argentina," mm. 33-34a
  4. Example 15.24 - Lloyd Webber and Rice, "Don't Cry for Me Argentina," mm. 33-34a

 Chapter 16 - Further Expansions of the Basic Phrase: Tonic Expansions, Root Progressions, and the Mediant Triad

  1. Example 16.2 - Mozart, Piano Sonata in B-flat Major, K. 333, first movement, mm. 1-4a
  2. Example 16.3 - "Wayfaring Stranger," mm. 1-4a
  3. Example 16.4 - Sherman and Sherman, "Feed the Birds," mm. 1-4
  4. Example 16.12 - McLean, "Vincent," mm. 4-11a
  5. Example 16.17 - Foster, "Camptown Races," mm. 1-4a
  6. Example 16.18 - "Wayfaring Stranger," mm. 1-8a
  7. Example 16.19 - Mussorgsky, "The Great Gate of Kiev," from Pictures at an Exhibition, mm. 18-22
  8. Example 16.20 - Owens, "Doxology," mm 1-4a

 Chapter 17 - The Interaction of Melody and Harmony: More on Cadence, Phrase, and Melody

  1. Example 17.3 - Mozart, Kyrie, from Requiem, mm. 49-52
  2. Example 17.5 - Handel, "Hallelujah!" from Messiah, mm. 86-94
  3. Example 17.6 - Lennon and McCartney, "Nowhere Man," mm. 1-7
  4. Example 17.10 - Foster, "Oh! Susanna," mm. 1-8

 Chapter 18 - Diatonic Sequences

  1. Example 18.8 - Bach, Prelude, from Cello Suite No. 2 in D minor, mm. 1-13a
  2. Example 18.11 - Bach, Invention in F Major, mm. 21-24
  3. Example 18.12 - Kern and Hammerstein, "All the Things You Are," mm. 5-12 (falling-fifth sequence with seventh chords)
  4. Example 18.14a - Mozart, Rondo in E-flat Major for Horn and Orchestra, K. 371, mm. 20-24a
  5. Example 18.17 - Pachelbel, Canon in D, mm. 1-8
  6. Example 18.19 - Mozart, Dies Irae, from Requiem, mm. 27-29

 Chapter 19 - Intensifying the Dominant: Secondary Dominants and Secondary Leading-Tone Chords; New Voice-Leading Chords

  1. Example 19.2 - Sherman and Sherman, "Feed the Birds," mm. 1-8
  2. Example 19.10 - Mozart, Rondo in E-flat Major for Horn and Orchestra, K. 371, mm. 88-104
  3. Example 19.15 - Schubert, "Gute Nacht" ("Good Night"), from Winterreise, mm. 87b-93a
  4. Example 19.17 - Chopin, Prelude in C minor, Op. 28, No. 20, m. 5

 Chapter 20 - Phrase Rhythm and Motivic Analysis

  1. Example 20.5 - Schumann, "Widmung" ("Dedication"), mm. 1-3
  2. Example 20.8 - Bach, Prelude, from Cello Suite No. 2 in D minor, mm. 1-13a
  3. Example 20.9 - Bach, Prelude, from Cello Suite No. 2 in D minor, mm. 40-48
  4. Example 20.12a - Bach, Fugue in D-sharp minor, from The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I, mm. 4-6a
  5. Example 20.12b - Bach, Fugue in D-sharp minor, from The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I, mm. 27-34a
  6. Example 20.12c - Bach, Fugue in D-sharp minor, from The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book I, mm. 62-67a


 Chapter 21 - Tonicizing Scale Degrees Other Than V

  1. Example 21.2 - Bach, "Es ist gewisslich an der Zeit," mm. 4b-6a
  2. Example 21.9 - Menken and Rice, "A Whole New World," mm. 28b-37a

 Chapter 22 - Modulation to Closely Related Keys

  1. Example 22.7a - Schubert, "Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt (Lied der Mignon)," mm. 7-14 (vocal line)
  2. Example 22.7b - Schubert, "Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt (Lied der Mignon)," mm. 11-14 (vocal line)
  3. Example 22.8 - Schubert, "Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt," mm. 7-15a

 Chapter 23 - Binary and Ternary Forms

There are no Scores & Audio available for this chapter.


 Chapter 24 - Color and Drama in Composition: Modal Mixture and Chromatic Mediants and Submediants

  1. Example 24.5 - Schubert, "Im Dorfe," from Winterreise, mm. 31b-50
  2. Example 24.9 - Schubert, Moment musical in A-flat Major, Op. 94, No. 6, mm. 1-39
  3. Example 24.10a - Brahms, Intermezzo in A Major, Op. 118, No. 2, mm. 1-4a
  4. Example 24.10b - Brahms, Intermezzo in A Major, Op. 118, No. 2, mm. 49-52

 Chapter 25 - Chromatic Approaches to V: The Neapolitan Sixth and Augmented Sixths

  1. Example 25.4a - Mozart, Dies Irae, from Requiem, mm. 22-29
  2. Example 25.4b - Mozart, Dies Irae, from Requiem, mm. 34-40a
  3. Example 25.11 - Kern and Hammerstein, "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man," mm. 27-33a
  4. Example 25.15 - Chopin, Prelude in C minor, Op. 28, No. 20, mm. 5-6
  5. Example 25.18 - Schubert, "Der Doppelgänger," mm. 36-46a


 Chapter 26 - Popular Song and Art Song

  1. Example 26.3 - Myers and Freedman, "Rock Around the Clock" (refrain melody)
  2. Example 26.9 - Lennon and McCartney, "Eleanor Rigby," mm. 9-12

 Chapter 27 - Variation and Rondo

  1. Example 27.6 - Beethoven, Variations on "God Save the King," Variation VI, mm. 1-6

 Chapter 28 - Sonata-Form Movements

There are no Scores & Audio available for this chapter.


 Chapter 29 - Chromaticism

  1. Example 29.5a - Schubert, "Die Wegweiser," from Winterreise, mm. 68b-77a
  2. Example 29.7 - Kern and Harbach, "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes," mm. 21-24
  3. Example 29.9 - Sousa, "The Washington Post March," mm. 1-7
  4. Example 29.11 - Sousa, "The Washington Post March," mm. 8-17
  5. Example 29.13 - Kern and Harbach, "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes," mm. 13-16a
  6. Example 29.19 - Kern and Harbach, "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes," mm. 16b-24
  7. Example 29.28 - Wagner, Prelude to Tristan und Isolde, mm. 1-17a


 Chapter 30 - Modes, Scales, and Sets

  1. Example 30.4a - Bartók, "Five-Tone Scale," from Mikrokosmos (No. 78), mm. 1-8
  2. Example 30.4b - Bartók, "Five-Tone Scale," from Mikrokosmos (No. 78), mm. 9-19
  3. Example 30.5 - Debussy, "Voiles," from Preludes, Book I, mm. 33-40

 Chapter 31 - Music Analysis with Sets

There are no Scores & Audio available for this chapter.


 Chapter 32 - Sets and Set Classes

  1. Example 32.8 - Bartók, "Whole-Tone Scales," mm. 1-3
  2. Example 32.9 - Debussy, "La cathédral engloutie," mm. 72-75
  3. Example 32.10a - Bartók, Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, mm. 1-2 (piano 1)
  4. Example 32.10b - Bartók, Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, mm. 33-34 (pianos 1 and 2)
  5. Example 32.12 - Messiaen, "Liturgie de crystal," from Quartet for the End of Time, mm. 5-9

 Chapter 33 - Ordered Segments and Serialism

There are no Scores & Audio available for this chapter.


 Chapter 34 - Twelve-Tone Rows and the Row Matrix

There are no Scores & Audio available for this chapter.


 Chapter 35 - New Ways to Organize Rhythm, Meter, and Duration

  1. Example 35.3 - Stravinsky, Les noces, Tableau II, mm. 54-59
  2. Example 35.6 - Ligeti, Hungarian Etudes, third movement, mm. 1-7
  3. Example 35.9 - Bartók, "Syncopation," from Mikrokosmos, mm. 1-4
  4. Example 35.11 - Messiaen, "Danse de la fureur," from Quartet for the End of Time, mm. 27-31
  5. Example 35.15 - Ligeti, Continuum, "measures" 1-22
  6. Example 35.16a - Boulez, Structures Ia, mm. 24-31 (piano 2)
  7. Example 35.17 - Nono, Il canto sospeso, mm. 108-109 (soprano and alto parts)
  8. Example 35.19 - Carter, String Quartet No. 2, mm. 7-13

 Chapter 36 - New Ways to Articulate Musical Form

  1. Example 36.3a - Ligeti, Ten Pieces for Wind Quintet, ninth movement
  2. Example 36.4 - Ligeti, "Wenn aus die Ferne," from Three Fantasies on Texts by Friedrich Hölderlin, mm. 19-23 (alto parts)
  3. Example 36.6 - Riley, In C, first four patterns

 Chapter 37 - The Composerís Materials Today

  1. Example 37.1 - Reich, Proverb, mm. 1-22a (sopranos 1 and 2)
  2. Example 37.2 - Pärt, Magnificat, opening two phrases
  3. Example 37.4 - Williams, "Imperial March," from The Empire Strikes Back, mm. 1-7
  4. Example 37.5 - Ligeti, "Désordre," from Piano Etudes, Book I, mm. 1-8