Audio & Video Sources

President George W. Bush's Address on the USA Patriot Act (April 17, 2004)

Download Audio (MP3)

Right-click (Ctrl-click for Mac users) the above link and select "Save Link As..."

»Sample Media Worksheet

Click here to show/hide Media Worksheet.

Transcript

In late March 2004, Congress passed the USA Patriot Act, a sweeping revision of the nation's surveillance, immigration, and civil liberties laws. In this speech, George Bush explained why he supported the PATRIOT Act as a prudent and measured step toward securing the nation against terrorism. Consider the arguments that President Bush made in favor of the PATRIOT Act. What dangers, if any, did he acknowledge in restricting Americans' civil liberties? In your view, did the act accomplish what the president promised?

President George W. Bush’s Goree Island Speech (July 8, 2003)

Download Audio (MP3)

Right-click (Ctrl-click for Mac users) the above link and select "Save Link As..."

»Sample Media Worksheet

Click here to show/hide Media Worksheet.

Transcript

During a visit to the African nation of Senegal, President Bush apologized to African leaders for the United States’ past involvement in slavery. In his speech, Bush emphasized the tragic theft of the liberty (and often the lives) of millions of Africans during the 250-year history of American slavery. Bush admitted that the racism born with slavery in America had long outlived the institution of slavery itself, but he praised the way that "the very people traded into slavery helped to set America free." Consider how President Bush grappled with the seeming contradiction of slavery and American freedom and also how he defined America’s role in a post-colonial and increasingly democratic Africa.

From The National Security Strategy of the United States (September 2002)

Download Audio (MP3)

Right-click (Ctrl-click for Mac users) the above link and select "Save Link As..."

»Sample Media Worksheet

Click here to show/hide Media Worksheet.

Transcript

The great struggles of the twentieth century between liberty and totalitarianism ended with a decisive victory for the forces of freedom--and a single sustainable model for national success: freedom, democracy, and free enterprise. . . . These values of freedom are right and true for every person, in every society. . . . Today, the international community has the best chance since the rise of the nation-state in the seventeenth century to build a world where great powers compete in peace instead of continually prepare for war. . . . The United States will use this moment of opportunity to extend the benefits of freedom across the globe. We will actively work to bring the hope of democracy, development, free markets, and free trade to every corner of the world. . . . In building a balance of power that favors freedom, the United States is guided by the conviction that all nations have important responsibilities. Nations that enjoy freedom must actively fight terror. Nations that depend on international stability must help prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction. . . . Throughout history, freedom has been threatened by war and terror; it has been challenged by the clashing wills of powerful states and the evil designs of tyrants; and it has been tested by widespread poverty and disease. Today, humanity holds in its hands the opportunity to further freedom's triumph over all these foes. The United States welcomes our opportunity to lead in this great mission.