Chapter 29: From Isolation To Global War

Chapter Outline

  1. Postwar isolationism
    1. Evidences of isolationist sentiment
    2. Counteractions of world involvement
    3. Relations with the League
    4. War-debt tangle
      1. American loans
      2. Problems with repayment of debt
      3. Linkage of debts to reparations
      4. Depression and debt cancellation
    5. Efforts toward disarmament
      1. Arms limitations
      2. Strained Japanese-American relationships
      3. Washington Armaments Conference
        1. Hughesís initiative
        2. Agreements made at the conference
        3. Effects of the treaties
      4. The movement to outlaw war
        1. Origins of the movement
        2. Development of the Kellogg-Briand Pact
    6. The Good-Neighbor Policy
      1. Early efforts to improve relations with Latin America
        1. Colombia
        2. Dominican Republic
        3. Nicaragua
      2. Protection of U.S. rights in Mexico
      3. Hooverís moves to improve policy
        1. Ending de jure recognition
        2. Clark Memorandum on the Monroe Doctrine
      4. Further improvements under FDR
  2. War clouds
    1. Japanese incursion in China
      1. Japanese occupation of Manchuria
      2. Reactions to occupation
        1. The Stimson Doctrine
        2. League condemnation
        3. Japanís withdrawal from the League
    2. Mussoliniís rise to power
    3. Hitlerís rise to power
      1. Events leading to his control
      2. Reactions to his provocations
    4. U.S. actions
      1. Rooseveltís refusal to support the London Economic Conference
      2. Hullís Reciprocal Trade Agreements
      3. Recognition of the Soviet Union
    5. Aggression in Asia and Europe
      1. Italian invasion of Ethiopia, 1935
      2. Hitlerís occupation of the Rhineland, 1936
      3. Spanish Civil War, 1936
      4. Japanese invasion of China, 1937
      5. Hitlerís Anschluss with Austria, 1938
      6. The Munich Agreement, 1938
      7. War began over Poland, 1939
  3. U.S. efforts for neutrality
    1. Impact of the Nye Committee investigations
    2. Walter Millisís popular view
    3. Congressional effort to avoid World War I
    4. The first Neutrality Act, 1935
      1. Forbade sale of arms to belligerents
      2. Travel discouraged on belligerent ships
    5. Reaction to the invasion of Ethiopia
    6. The second Neutrality Act forbade loans to belligerents
    7. Extension of the Neutrality Act to cover civil wars
    8. Further neutrality provisions
    9. Reactions to Japanese action in China
      1. Lack of use of neutrality laws
      2. Quarantine speech
      3. Panay incident
      4. Ludlow Amendment
    10. Reactions to war in Europe
      1. Change to cash-and-carry arms sales
      2. Extension of war zone
  4. IThe storm in Europe
    1. Hitlerís Blitzkrieg
    2. U.S. aid to embattled Britain
      1. Growth of U.S. defense effort
      2. Sales of arms to Britain
    3. Other defense measures
    4. The destroyer-bases deal
    5. Peacetime conscription
    6. Polarization of public opinion
      1. Committee to Defend America
      2. America First Committee
  5. The election of 1940
    1. The choice of Willkie
    2. The choice of FDR
    3. The campaign
    4. Results of the election
  6. The arsenal of democracy
    1. The Lend-Lease program
    2. Further Axis gains
    3. Reaction to the invasion of the Soviet Union
    4. The Atlantic Charter
    5. Conflict with the Germans in the Atlantic
  7. The storm in the Pacific
    1. Japanese aggression in Southeast Asia
    2. Japanís pacts with Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union
    3. Negotiations between Japan and the United States
    4. D.Warlords gain control in Japan
    5. Attack on Pearl Harbor
      1. Extent of U.S. foreknowledge
      2. Errors in warning
      3. Damage from the attack
      4. Other Japanese aggression in the Pacific
    6. Declaration of war
Close this Page