Chapter 15: The Old South

Chapter Outline

  1. The Old South
    1. Southern mythology
    2. Explanations of distinctiveness
      1. Geography and weather
      2. Human factors
        1. Biracial population
        2. Conscious and defensive minority
        3. Farming
        4. Belief in distinctiveness
    3. Agriculture
      1. Staple crops
        1. Tobacco, indigo, rice, sugar, and hemp
        2. Cotton
          1. Huge demand
          2. New lands in Southwest
      2. Self-sufficient general farming
      3. Economic worries
        1. Soil exhaustion
        2. Agricultural diversification
    4. Manufacturing and trade
      1. Decline in manufacturing
      2. Calls for diversification
      3. Explanations for lack of development
  2. White society in the South
    1. Plantations
      1. Defined
      2. The planter
      3. The plantation mistress
        1. Supervisor of domestic slaves
        2. Sexual double standard
      4. Overseers
    2. The middle class
      1. Largest group
      2. Land ownership
      3. Style of life
    3. Poor whites
      1. Characteristics
      2. Health
    4. Culture of honor and violence
      1. Code of honor
      2. Outlets in popular rituals
        1. Manliness
        2. Duels
  3. African Americans in the Old South
    1. Background of slavery
    2. Free persons of color
      1. Legal status
      2. Mulattos
      3. Slaveholders
    3. Slave trade
      1. Numbers and values
      2. End of African slave trade
      3. Domestic trade
    4. Plantation slavery
      1. Jobs
      2. General conditions
    5. Slave women
      1. Value for reproduction
      2. Work
      3. Threat of sexual abuse
      4. Opportunity for escape
      5. Celia
    6. Slave resistance
      1. Gabriel
      2. Denmark Vesey
      3. Nat Turner
      4. Malingering and sabotage
    7. The slave community
      1. Diversity
      2. Cohesion and pride
    8. Slave religion and folklore
      1. African and Christian elements
      2. Use of religion as an instrument of white control and black refuge
      3. The uses of folklore
    9. The slave family
      1. Legal status
      2. Importance of the nuclear family
      3. Sexual exploitation of slaves
  4. The Old Southwest
    1. Description
    2. Migration
      1. Reasons to move
      2. Women underrepresented
      3. Reactions of slaves
      4. Nature of journey
    3. Masculine culture
  5. Antislavery movements
    1. Early opponents of slavery
      1. Few white southerners
      2. American Colonization Society
    2. Movement toward abolitionism
      1. From gradualism to immediatism
      2. William Lloyd Garrison
      3. New England Anti-Slavery Society
      4. American Anti-Slavery Society
    3. Splits in abolitionism
      1. Radical vs. reformer
      2. Role of women
    4. Black abolitionists
      1. Critical of white antislavery efforts
      2. Frederick Douglass
      3. Sojourner Truth
    5. Reaction to antislavery agitation
      1. Hostility
      2. “Gag rule” in Congress
      3. Development of Liberty party
      4. Defenses of slavery
        1. Role of churches
        2. Inferiority of blacks
        3. Practical considerations
        4. Compared to northern industry
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