1. Plate XXXII: disks representing individual universes centered around "the most perfect of Beings." From Thomas Wright of Durham's An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe (1750).
  2. Engraving of a comet crashing into the zodiac (1680).
  3. Illustration of his microscope. From Robert Hooke's Micrographia (1665).
  4. Title page of Robert Hooke's Micrographia (1665).
  5. Illustrations of snowflakes. Plate VI of Robert Hooke's Micrographia (1665).
  6. Illustration of a flea. From Robert Hooke's Micrographia (1665).
  7. Detail of a fly's eye. Illustration by Anton van Leeuwenhoek.
  8. Illustration of a fly's eye. From Robert Hooke's Micrographia (1665).
  9. Galileo's telescope.
  10. The phases of the moon. Drawings by Galileo.
  11. Blaise Pascal. Etching and engraving.
  12. Title page of Blaise Pascal's Pensées (1670).
  13. Engraving of Margaret Cavendish by Peter van Schuppen. From the frontispiece to Philosophical and Physical Opinions (1655). The Warder Collection.
  14. Detail from an engraving of Margaret Cavendish. Peter van Schuppen. From the frontispiece to Philosophical and Physical Opinions (1655).
  15. Illustration from Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds (Entretiens sur la pluralité des mondes) (1686) by Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle.
  16. Drawing of Saturn. From Christiaan Huygens's The Celestial Worlds Discover'd (1698).
  17. The World in the Moon. Engraving by Fillipo Morghen from Raccolta (1766).
  18. Drawing of James Ferguson's orrery.
  19. A Philosopher Giving That Lecture on the Orrery, in Which a Lamp Is Put in Place of the Sun (1766). Joseph Wright.
  20. Plate XXII: "[The Milky Way] a vast Gulph, or Medium, every way extended like a Plane, and inclosed between two surfaces." From Thomas Wright of Durham's An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe (1750).
  21. William Herschel's 1784 illustration of the Milky Way.
  22. This send-up of the plurality of worlds appeared in "Un autre monde" ("Another World," 1844). The artist J. J. Grandville (pseudonym of Jean-Ignace-Isidore Gérard), may have been satirizing the utopian cosmology of Charles Fourier (1772–1837), who envisioned a future in which humanity would join the stars in universal harmony.

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