Chemistry in the News

Science Daily

Halving hydrogen: First view of nature-inspired catalyst after ripping hydrogen apart provides insights for better fuel cells
Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:28:32 EDT
A fuel cell catalyst that converts hydrogen into electricity must tear open a hydrogen molecule. Now researchers have captured a view of such a catalyst holding onto the two halves of its hydrogen feast, provides insight into how to make the catalyst work better.

Following a protein's travel inside cells is key to improving patient monitoring, drug development
Wed, 23 Apr 2014 11:15:59 EDT
A technique to detect subcellular location of a protein has been developed by scientists. In science, "simple and accessible detection methods that can rapidly screen a large cell population with the resolution of a single cell inside that population has been seriously lacking," said one engineer involved in the study. Their work involved a simple and unique tweak to the conventional cell staining process allowed the researchers to accurately define the subcellular location of the protein by measuring the amount of the residual protein after release.

Steering chemical reactions with laser pulses
Wed, 23 Apr 2014 10:27:50 EDT
Ultra short laserpulses in the femtosecond-range give scientists a powerful new method of controlling chemical reactions. A team of researchers could now show that the fragmentation of carbohydrates can be controlled by these pulses.

Checking up on crude oil in the ground: Nanoreporters tell 'sour' oil from 'sweet'
Tue, 22 Apr 2014 13:46:36 EDT
Scientists have created a nanoscale detector that checks for and reports on the presence and concentration of hydrogen sulfide in crude oil and natural gas while they're still in the ground.

Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes: Composite material inspired by shrimp stronger than standard used in airplane frames
Tue, 22 Apr 2014 13:09:44 EDT
Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis shrimp, researchers have developed a design structure for composite materials that is more impact resistant and tougher than the standard used in airplanes. The peacock mantis shrimp, or stomatopod, is a 4- to 6-inch-long rainbow-colored crustacean with a fist-like club that accelerates underwater faster than a 22-calibur bullet.